CDs are Outdated?: Blame It On The Sun
By
J. Gordon
12/11/2005 9:34:48 PM

In the race to release the first complete CD/DVD, The Sun’s Blame It On Youth won by a nose with its industry first Fall 2005 release--at least as the first CD/DVD in the alternative pop genre.

“As soon as we started doing this, we learned that 50 Cent was also doing it at the same time,” says The Sun’s Bryan Arendt, guitarist, says with exasperation. “I don’t know if he’s doing a DVD now, but he’s definitely doing a video for every song on his record.” And he got it released a week or two before The Sun. Damn that Fiddy.

“CDs are outdated,” Arendt says. He explains that people don’t really understand his perspective on this subject since he gave a quote in the LA Times proclaiming his band’s DVD, Blame It On Youth [Warner Bros.] was a statement against CDs. He tells nighttimes.com, “A DVD can offer you a lot more. Fans like to get as much from a band as they can, and what makes a good band is character, on top of the music. The DVD shows off our character a lot better.”

And character is one thing The Sun isn’t short on. A cross between Weezer and your favorite 80s band, The Sun isn’t aiming their guns at any one genre; rather, they’re machine gun spraying notes across every rock and pop style from the last thirty years.

This Columbus Ohio-based band of twenty-somethings are constantly writing, says Arendt, and they actually recorded about forty songs before narrowing it down to these fourteen. Producers Ben Hiller (Blur, Doves, Elbow) and John Goodmanson (Sleater-Kinney, Death Cab for Cutie, Hot Hot Heat) helped to put the finishing touches on Blame It On Youth that really set it apart from the band’s debut EP, Love and Death.

The audio-only version of their record, reviewed earlier this year on Nighttimes.com, was sold at shows on their tour and online, but was never officially released, says Arendt. The Blame It On Youth CD/DVD, however, contains 14 full-length videos—a few of serious artistic merit. How could an up-and-coming band afford such a feat?

“We were able to get videos made for pretty cheap, using friends, shooting on digital, not doing it the traditional way,” says Arendt. “A lot of bands get these big video budgets and spend it on catering. We just worked with people we already knew, to work for free or at cost.” Bryan Arendt says they worked with directors who were excited about the band, and film students in their hometown of Columbus, Ohio. “When we had three or four of these done, Warner asked us if we wanted to do one for every song on the record.”

The opening tracks are straight-up performance shots, often done with humor and some fancy camera work. But then the DVD starts to take off: The song, “284” jettisons the viewer into a cheesy, B-movie horror flick. “Lost At Home,” one of the best songs on the album, is done like an old-fashioned screen test in black and white. There just aren’t words to describe the ultra-personal masturbation scenes (shot from the neck up, it gives the term in-your-face a whole new meaning) for the song “Romantic Death.” There’s the silly long hair antics of “Rockstop” and the homicidal bride of “We Tried” to break up any chance of boredom.

There’s no doubt that fans of The Sun will flip over this DVD. But hey, who are we kidding? Not many know The Sun yet. Here’s a great introduction, as well as terrific background entertainment to your next party or get together.

“We just want to play shows for a room full of people,” says Arendt. “We don’t want to be super famous. Something like Wilco. They’re known, but not household names.”

The entire collection of videos can be streamed online into your household through their website, www.thesunwebsite.com and some videos can be viewed on myspace.com, I-Tunes and purevolume.com.

“As soon as we started doing this, we learned that 50 Cent was also doing it at the same time,” says The Sun’s Bryan Arendt, guitarist, says with exasperation. “I don’t know if he’s doing a DVD now, but he’s definitely doing a video for every song on his record.” And he got it released a week or two before The Sun. Damn that Fiddy.

“CDs are outdated,” Arendt says. He explains that people don’t really understand his perspective on this subject since he gave a quote in the LA Times proclaiming his band’s DVD, Blame It On Youth [Warner Bros.] was a statement against CDs. He tells nighttimes.com, “A DVD can offer you a lot more. Fans like to get as much from a band as they can, and what makes a good band is character, on top of the music. The DVD shows off our character a lot better.”

And character is one thing The Sun isn’t short on. A cross between Weezer and your favorite 80s band, The Sun isn’t aiming their guns at any one genre; rather, they’re machine gun spraying notes across every rock and pop style from the last thirty years.

This Columbus Ohio-based band of twenty-somethings are constantly writing, says Arendt, and they actually recorded about forty songs before narrowing it down to these fourteen. Producers Ben Hiller (Blur, Doves, Elbow) and John Goodmanson (Sleater-Kinney, Death Cab for Cutie, Hot Hot Heat) helped to put the finishing touches on Blame It On Youth that really set it apart from the band’s debut EP, Love and Death.

The audio-only version of their record, reviewed earlier this year on Nighttimes.com, was sold at shows on their tour and online, but was never officially released, says Arendt. The Blame It On Youth CD/DVD, however, contains 14 full-length videos—a few of serious artistic merit. How could an up-and-coming band afford such a feat?

“We were able to get videos made for pretty cheap, using friends, shooting on digital, not doing it the traditional way,” says Arendt. “A lot of bands get these big video budgets and spend it on catering. We just worked with people we already knew, to work for free or at cost.” Bryan Arendt says they worked with directors who were excited about the band, and film students in their hometown of Columbus, Ohio. “When we had three or four of these done, Warner asked us if we wanted to do one for every song on the record.”

The opening tracks are straight-up performance shots, often done with humor and some fancy camera work. But then the DVD starts to take off: The song, “284” jettisons the viewer into a cheesy, B-movie horror flick. “Lost At Home,” one of the best songs on the album, is done like an old-fashioned screen test in black and white. There just aren’t words to describe the ultra-personal masturbation scenes (shot from the neck up, it gives the term in-your-face a whole new meaning) for the song “Romantic Death.” There’s the silly long hair antics of “Rockstop” and the homicidal bride of “We Tried” to break up any chance of boredom.

There’s no doubt that fans of The Sun will flip over this DVD. But hey, who are we kidding? Not many know The Sun yet. Here’s a great introduction, as well as terrific background entertainment to your next party or get together.

“We just want to play shows for a room full of people,” says Arendt. “We don’t want to be super famous. Something like Wilco. They’re known, but not household names.”

The entire collection of videos can be streamed online into your household through their website, www.thesunwebsite.com and some videos can be viewed on myspace.com, I-Tunes and purevolume.com.

 

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